Wet Filter Turns Moldy

Operators, make sure you keep a close eye on the 621G scraper’s cab air filter, especially after a heavy rain.

The filter’s access door has a series of louvers that allows open air flow. Problem is, the louvers also allow water from rain and cab run-off inside the door. That water fills the channel along the inside bottom of the door.

If there’s too much water, it overflows the channel and the air filter soaks it up like a sponge. A soaked filter element gets moldy real quick!

MS-7535-M, Fig 1.jpg

You may also see buildup from water that seeps past the drain hoses attached to the A/C drip pan.

The hoses are installed with a grommet that fits into a hole in the plastic drip pan. But the grommet doesn’t fit tight and the silicone sealant holding it in place gives way from vehicle vibration.

Here’s the bottom line. There’s a fix in the works to get rid of the water. But in the meantime, make sure the air filter element stays clean and dry. Replace a wet or moldy filter with NSN 4330-01-602-0614. If it’s just dirty, clean the filter with low-pressure air (30 psi or less).


Are You Flying with the Right Radio?

Pilots, having the right radio in your Lakota rotorcraft is the difference between communicating and not communicating.

The bad news is that some RT-5000 radios meant for Kiowa OH-58A/C models have been installed on the Lakota UH-72A models. The wrong radio sets were moved into unit avionic stocks and used in Lakotas as line replaceable units (LRUs).

 

Both airframes use RT-5000, remote-mount, multi-band AM/FM transceiver radios. The version used for OH-58A/C Kiowas does not allow for digital transmission and reception of the same frequency signals like the RT-5000 approved for the Lakota.

If your UH-72A’s radio isn’t operating properly, eyeball the part number (PN) and cross check that PN against the proper supplemental type certificate (STC) for the correct Mission Equipment Package (MEP) of the rotorcraft.

Lakotas operating in a security and support (S&S) MEP, need the RT-5000s with PN 400-105525-6011 for comm #4, and PN 400-105525-6111 for comm #5. For Lakotas in a non-S&S MEP configuration, the RT-5000 radio should be PN 400-015525-5111 operating in comm #4.

If you find an unauthorized radio in your Lakota, make the following entry in the aircraft logbook:

 

“RT-5000 (PN 400-015525-xxxx*) required removal and replacement per aircraft’s STC with correct RT-5000 (PN 400-015525-xxxx*)”

*Ensure the PN(s) reflect the RT-5000 to be removed and the correct PN(s) for the MEP version that is going to be installed.

Got questions about the RT-5000 radio? Contact Keith Stilwell, DSN 645-0797, (256) 955-0797 or email:

keith.e.stilwell.civ@mail.mil


Stocking Bench Stock

Keeping stock of shop and bench stock can be a real pain in the rear for mechanics responsible for a wide variety of Army equipment.

Wherever maintenance take place, bench stock should be available for use in each location. Bench stock is 30 days of supply (DOS) and is low cost, high use, consumable Class II, III (packaged), IV and IX (less components) items used by maintenance personnel at an unpredictable rate.

All the details are in AR 710-2, Supply Policy Below National Level (Mar 08). Check out Para 2-23 for shop stock and Para 2-24 for bench stock.

Bench stock consists of common hardware like resistors, wire, tubing, rope, welding rods, sandpaper, gasket material, sheet metal, seals, oils, grease, repair kits and more. Always make sure you get semiannual approval for a shop and bench stock list from your maintenance officer.

When you’ve got a lot of bench stock, you’ll need somewhere to keep it. For a few dollars, your unit can order a small parts storage box, NSN 8115-00-663-0212 or two transport and storage cases, NSN 8115-00-663-0213. The first case has 64 plastic drawers that are 3x3x5 inches each. The second case has 24 plastic drawers. Sixteen are 6x2x5 inches. The remaining eight of them are 6x4x5 inches. All the drawers come with dividers and a slot for inserting a label.


Pick the Right Type and Number of Jacks

Mechanics, aircraft jacks are vital for maintenance on your helicopter. They’ve been around for years and gone through a lot of changes. Some have been put out to pasture while others have been neglected.

Now, that won’t be a problem anymore because we told you on Pages 27-30 of PS 760 (Mar 16), how to maintain your jacked up jacks.

With all the changes, sometimes it’s difficult to determine which jack is used for which aircraft task. No longer. Here’s a list of the maintenance tasks that require jacks and how many to use:

Apache

   NOTE: These are typical tasks which require the aircraft to be placed on jacks. Please ensure you follow TM 1-1520-Longbow/Apache (IETM) for specific requirements, size, placement, warnings, cautions, and notes for all jacks.

  • Jacking aircraft, 3 point, using a tripod jack requires two 5-ton jacks, NSN 1730-00-516-2018, and one 3-ton jack, NSN 1730-00-734-9382. The Fuselage adapter, NSN 1560-01-226-7551, will also be used.
  • Jacking aircraft, 2 point, using a tripod jack requires two 5-ton jacks, NSN 1730-00-516-2018. The Fuselage adapter, NSN 1560-01-226-7551, will also be used.
  • Jacking tail landing gear using a tripod jack requires one 3-ton jack, NSN 1740-00-734-9382.
  • Jacking the main landing gear, 1 point, using an axle jack requires one 5-ton jack, NSN 1740-00-540-2343.                Chinook
  •    Note that Apache is the only helicopter airframe that uses the 5-ton jack, NSN 1730-00-516-2018.
  •  Jacking an entire Chinook requires two 12-ton jacks, NSN 1730-00-912-3998, and two 10-ton jacks, NSN 1730-00-203-4697. As an alternative method, you can use two 12-ton jacks, NSN 1730-00-912-3998, and one 10-ton jack, NSN 1730-01-563-7046.
  •  Replacing the forward right- or left-hand gear assembly requires one 10-ton jack, NSN 1730-01-563-7046. However, the aircraft weight must be below 24, 500 pounds.
  •  Replacing the forward right- or left-hand tire assembly requires one 10-ton jack, NSN 1730-203-4697.
  •  Replacing the aft right- or left- hand gear assemblies requires one 12-ton jack, NSN 1730-00-912-3998.
  •  Replacing the aft right- or left- hand tire assembly requires one 12-ton jack, NSN 1730-00-912-3998.
  • Weighing aircraft using load cells (3 point) with a max gross weight of 24,500 pounds requires two 12-ton jacks, NSN 1730-00-912-3998, and one 10-ton jack, NSN 1730-01-563-7046.
  •  Weighing aircraft using load cells (4 point) with a max gross weight of 33,000 pounds requires two 12-ton jacks, NSN 1730-00-912-3998, and two 10-ton jacks, NSN 1730-00-203-4697.
  •         A/C Model Kiowa Warrior
  • Jacking an entire OH-58A/C requires three 12-ton jacks, NSN 1730-00-912-3998.
  •          D-Model Kiowa Warrior
  •  Jacking an entire OH-58D requires   three 12-ton jacks, NSN 1730-00-912-3998.          Black Hawk Aircraft
  •    NOTE: When a Kiowa is on jacks, use an overhead hoist or cable support to maintain the aircraft. This is done as a safety precaution in the event a strong wind gust blows through the hangar and knocks the Kiowa off the jacks.
  •  Jacking requires three 12-ton jacks, NSN 1730-00-201-4849.
  •  Removal and installation of the right- and left-hand landing gear shock strut requires one 12-ton jack, NSN 1730-00-201-4849.
  • Jacking the right- and left-hand main landing gear wheel and tire assembly requires one 10-ton jack, NSN 1730-00-203-4697.
  • Removal and installation of the tail landing gear shock strut requires one 12-ton jack, NSN 1730-00-201-4849.
  •  Removal and installation of the     tail landing gear wheel and tire assembly requires one 10-ton jack, NSN 1730-00-203-4697.
  •  Weighing the helicopter using load cells (3 point) requires three 12-ton jacks, NSN 1730-00-201-4849.
  •  Changing a flat tire or collapsed strut requires one 12-ton jack, NSN 1730-00-201-4849, or one 10-ton jack, NSN 1730-00-912-4697.
  •  Changing a flat tail tire or collapsed gear strut requires one 12-ton jack, NSN 1730-00-201-4849, and one 10-ton jack, NSN 1730-00-912-4697.
  •             Lakota Aircraft
  •  Jacking an entire UH-72A aircraft takes four jacks. The type of jack is not specified, but two 12-ton tripod jacks, NSN 1730-00-912-3998, and two 10-ton landing gear jacks, NSN 1730-00-203-4697, work well.
  •  Weighing the Lakota requires three jacks. The type of jack is not specified, but one 12-ton tripod jack, NSN 1730-00-912-3998 and two 10-ton landing gear jacks, NSN 1730-00-203-4697 work well.

Locking Block Can Ruin Your Piece of the PIED

The KGV-72 programmable in-line encryption device (PIED), NSN 5810-01-564-3364 (LIN E05008), is designed to encrypt Blue Force Tracking (BFT) message traffic.  But when it’s time to turn in the PIED, here’s a message that really needs to get through:

Don’t damage the locking block!

Too many units are losing or misplacing the padlock key.  So when it’s time to turn in the PIED, they use tools to remove the lock.  Unfortunately, that almost always breaks the locking block.

A broken block can’t be repaired.  Even worse, you can be held financially liable for replacing the $2,565.58 PIED per AR 735-5, Property Accountability Procedures and Financial Liability Officer’s Guide.  A DD Form 200, Financial Liability Investigation of Property Loss (FLIPL), along with a property book officer document number must be submitted at the time of the request to the item manager before an operational PIED can be issued.

So don’t lose the key to your lock.  And if you do, check with the item manager for instructions on what to do next.

kgv-72-fig-1


Watch Out for Bulging Tubes

Howitzers…
Watch Out for Bulging Tubes

Crewmen, it’s bad enough when explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) has to remove a stuck round from your 155mm howitzer. It’s a lot worse if you’re left with a bulging cannon tube!
That’s what could happen to your howitzer if EOD uses the water blast method to remove a stuck round.   The 155mm cannon tubes most at risk are the M7776 and M284 steel and M7776 and M284A2 chrome barrels.

If EOD uses the water blast method to extract a stuck round from your howitzer, inspect the cannon tube with a borescope. A bulge means the tube has to be condemned. If you suspect a bulge but can’t see one, use a pullover gage to measure the area where you suspect damage.
You’ll find the full scoop on inspecting for damage in TM 9-1000-202-14, Evaluation of Cannon Tubes. Appendix T covers the M7776 tube and Appendix U covers the M284 tube. EM 0065, which covers most small arms, has the TM, as does LOGSA’s ETM website:
https://www.logsa.army.mil/etms

Be sure to immediately notify your logistics assistance representative (LAR) or field service representative (FSR) if EOD removes a stuck round from your howitzer.
You are also required to report EOD round removal and any damage on DA Form 2408-4, Weapons Record Data Card, in the remarks column. You can access it at:
https://tulsa.tacom.army.mil/guncard/index.cfm


Keep M3 Tripod Until You Get M205

On Page 43 of PS 760 (Mar 16) we told you the good news that the M205 tripod is replacing the M3 tripod.

It’s good news because the M205 is 32 percent lighter than the M3 and also includes an integral traverse and elevating mechanism.

But some units are jumping the gun and turning in their M3s before they get the M205. Not a good idea! They could be without tripods for a long time until they do get the M205. So keep using your M3s until you get the M205.

But once you get the M205, it’s important you turn in your M3s within 30 days. The Army will continue to use M3s for 3-4 years, so they need your M3s for other units. If any M3s aren’t usable, turn them in for local disposal.

Do not try to order the M205. If will be fielded through total package fielding (TPF).

Questions? Contact Grant Baker at DSN 786-1238, (586) 282-1238, or email:

grant.t.baker.civ@mail.mil