Are You Flying with the Right Radio?

Pilots, having the right radio in your Lakota rotorcraft is the difference between communicating and not communicating.

The bad news is that some RT-5000 radios meant for Kiowa OH-58A/C models have been installed on the Lakota UH-72A models. The wrong radio sets were moved into unit avionic stocks and used in Lakotas as line replaceable units (LRUs).

 

Both airframes use RT-5000, remote-mount, multi-band AM/FM transceiver radios. The version used for OH-58A/C Kiowas does not allow for digital transmission and reception of the same frequency signals like the RT-5000 approved for the Lakota.

If your UH-72A’s radio isn’t operating properly, eyeball the part number (PN) and cross check that PN against the proper supplemental type certificate (STC) for the correct Mission Equipment Package (MEP) of the rotorcraft.

Lakotas operating in a security and support (S&S) MEP, need the RT-5000s with PN 400-105525-6011 for comm #4, and PN 400-105525-6111 for comm #5. For Lakotas in a non-S&S MEP configuration, the RT-5000 radio should be PN 400-015525-5111 operating in comm #4.

If you find an unauthorized radio in your Lakota, make the following entry in the aircraft logbook:

 

“RT-5000 (PN 400-015525-xxxx*) required removal and replacement per aircraft’s STC with correct RT-5000 (PN 400-015525-xxxx*)”

*Ensure the PN(s) reflect the RT-5000 to be removed and the correct PN(s) for the MEP version that is going to be installed.

Got questions about the RT-5000 radio? Contact Keith Stilwell, DSN 645-0797, (256) 955-0797 or email:

keith.e.stilwell.civ@mail.mil

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Pick the Right Type and Number of Jacks

Mechanics, aircraft jacks are vital for maintenance on your helicopter. They’ve been around for years and gone through a lot of changes. Some have been put out to pasture while others have been neglected.

Now, that won’t be a problem anymore because we told you on Pages 27-30 of PS 760 (Mar 16), how to maintain your jacked up jacks.

With all the changes, sometimes it’s difficult to determine which jack is used for which aircraft task. No longer. Here’s a list of the maintenance tasks that require jacks and how many to use:

Apache

   NOTE: These are typical tasks which require the aircraft to be placed on jacks. Please ensure you follow TM 1-1520-Longbow/Apache (IETM) for specific requirements, size, placement, warnings, cautions, and notes for all jacks.

  • Jacking aircraft, 3 point, using a tripod jack requires two 5-ton jacks, NSN 1730-00-516-2018, and one 3-ton jack, NSN 1730-00-734-9382. The Fuselage adapter, NSN 1560-01-226-7551, will also be used.
  • Jacking aircraft, 2 point, using a tripod jack requires two 5-ton jacks, NSN 1730-00-516-2018. The Fuselage adapter, NSN 1560-01-226-7551, will also be used.
  • Jacking tail landing gear using a tripod jack requires one 3-ton jack, NSN 1740-00-734-9382.
  • Jacking the main landing gear, 1 point, using an axle jack requires one 5-ton jack, NSN 1740-00-540-2343.                Chinook
  •    Note that Apache is the only helicopter airframe that uses the 5-ton jack, NSN 1730-00-516-2018.
  •  Jacking an entire Chinook requires two 12-ton jacks, NSN 1730-00-912-3998, and two 10-ton jacks, NSN 1730-00-203-4697. As an alternative method, you can use two 12-ton jacks, NSN 1730-00-912-3998, and one 10-ton jack, NSN 1730-01-563-7046.
  •  Replacing the forward right- or left-hand gear assembly requires one 10-ton jack, NSN 1730-01-563-7046. However, the aircraft weight must be below 24, 500 pounds.
  •  Replacing the forward right- or left-hand tire assembly requires one 10-ton jack, NSN 1730-203-4697.
  •  Replacing the aft right- or left- hand gear assemblies requires one 12-ton jack, NSN 1730-00-912-3998.
  •  Replacing the aft right- or left- hand tire assembly requires one 12-ton jack, NSN 1730-00-912-3998.
  • Weighing aircraft using load cells (3 point) with a max gross weight of 24,500 pounds requires two 12-ton jacks, NSN 1730-00-912-3998, and one 10-ton jack, NSN 1730-01-563-7046.
  •  Weighing aircraft using load cells (4 point) with a max gross weight of 33,000 pounds requires two 12-ton jacks, NSN 1730-00-912-3998, and two 10-ton jacks, NSN 1730-00-203-4697.
  •         A/C Model Kiowa Warrior
  • Jacking an entire OH-58A/C requires three 12-ton jacks, NSN 1730-00-912-3998.
  •          D-Model Kiowa Warrior
  •  Jacking an entire OH-58D requires   three 12-ton jacks, NSN 1730-00-912-3998.          Black Hawk Aircraft
  •    NOTE: When a Kiowa is on jacks, use an overhead hoist or cable support to maintain the aircraft. This is done as a safety precaution in the event a strong wind gust blows through the hangar and knocks the Kiowa off the jacks.
  •  Jacking requires three 12-ton jacks, NSN 1730-00-201-4849.
  •  Removal and installation of the right- and left-hand landing gear shock strut requires one 12-ton jack, NSN 1730-00-201-4849.
  • Jacking the right- and left-hand main landing gear wheel and tire assembly requires one 10-ton jack, NSN 1730-00-203-4697.
  • Removal and installation of the tail landing gear shock strut requires one 12-ton jack, NSN 1730-00-201-4849.
  •  Removal and installation of the     tail landing gear wheel and tire assembly requires one 10-ton jack, NSN 1730-00-203-4697.
  •  Weighing the helicopter using load cells (3 point) requires three 12-ton jacks, NSN 1730-00-201-4849.
  •  Changing a flat tire or collapsed strut requires one 12-ton jack, NSN 1730-00-201-4849, or one 10-ton jack, NSN 1730-00-912-4697.
  •  Changing a flat tail tire or collapsed gear strut requires one 12-ton jack, NSN 1730-00-201-4849, and one 10-ton jack, NSN 1730-00-912-4697.
  •             Lakota Aircraft
  •  Jacking an entire UH-72A aircraft takes four jacks. The type of jack is not specified, but two 12-ton tripod jacks, NSN 1730-00-912-3998, and two 10-ton landing gear jacks, NSN 1730-00-203-4697, work well.
  •  Weighing the Lakota requires three jacks. The type of jack is not specified, but one 12-ton tripod jack, NSN 1730-00-912-3998 and two 10-ton landing gear jacks, NSN 1730-00-203-4697 work well.

Watch Out for Bulging Tubes

Howitzers…
Watch Out for Bulging Tubes

Crewmen, it’s bad enough when explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) has to remove a stuck round from your 155mm howitzer. It’s a lot worse if you’re left with a bulging cannon tube!
That’s what could happen to your howitzer if EOD uses the water blast method to remove a stuck round.   The 155mm cannon tubes most at risk are the M7776 and M284 steel and M7776 and M284A2 chrome barrels.

If EOD uses the water blast method to extract a stuck round from your howitzer, inspect the cannon tube with a borescope. A bulge means the tube has to be condemned. If you suspect a bulge but can’t see one, use a pullover gage to measure the area where you suspect damage.
You’ll find the full scoop on inspecting for damage in TM 9-1000-202-14, Evaluation of Cannon Tubes. Appendix T covers the M7776 tube and Appendix U covers the M284 tube. EM 0065, which covers most small arms, has the TM, as does LOGSA’s ETM website:
https://www.logsa.army.mil/etms

Be sure to immediately notify your logistics assistance representative (LAR) or field service representative (FSR) if EOD removes a stuck round from your howitzer.
You are also required to report EOD round removal and any damage on DA Form 2408-4, Weapons Record Data Card, in the remarks column. You can access it at:
https://tulsa.tacom.army.mil/guncard/index.cfm


AN/PSQ-20/20A Goggles Blind? Good News!

If your AN/PSQ-20, NSN 5855-01-534-6449, or AN/PSQ-20A, NSN 5855-01-603-0489, night vision goggles aren’t working, there’s good news. You can get them fixed if they qualify.

The fix doesn’t cover ancillary items or components of end item for the goggles and is available only if the goggles fail after a thorough inspection following TM 11-5855-322-10 or TM 11-5855-335-10 or their -23&Ps. Your 94F repairman does that.

To get your goggles fixed, you’ll need a return authorization from the manufacturer. Get it by logging into the warranty repair portal:

https://nvwarranty.gs.exelisinc.com/Login.aspx

New users will need to register by clicking on the HERE button on the left side of the web page. Returning users can log on with their email address, password and DODAAC.

Once you receive a return authorization, fill out a DD Form 1348-1A and ship the goggles to:

Harris

Warranty/Customer Repair Service

7635 Plantation Road

Attention: Marketing Department RA#____

Roanoke, VA 24019

If you have questions, call Harris at (800) 533-5502 or (540) 563-0371.


PS for April has arrived!


Keeping Your Guard Up

            “Summertime…and the livin’ is easy.  Fish are jumpin’, and the cotton is high.”

            Lines from an old song that make you think summer is a time for fun, frolic and festivity.  And it can be–after you’ve done your job as a Soldier.

As a Soldier, you’re required to be ready at a moment’s notice to accomplish a mission.  That requirement extends to your equipment, whether you drive it, ride in it, carry it or just use it.

There’s always the temptation to enjoy summer fun (or avoid summer sun) and let some necessary jobs wait for cooler times. But missions have a nasty habit of coming up when we least expect them, regardless of the time of year.

So, if you’re not ready right now, get busy.

Do you preventive maintenance work–and do it safely–every day.  You can’t be ready any other way.


Ignorance Is the Pits

What you don’t know can’t hurt you, right?  Since when?  The truth is, what you don’t know is usually what really messes you up.

That goes big time for the conditions of your unit’s equipment. Not knowing that is one sure way to get hurt–maybe permanently.

         But, since you can’t inspect all of your unit’s equipment yourself, you have to train your soldiers to be your eyes and ears. Make sure they’re doing PMCS.  Make sure they are on the lookout for potential problems and report the problems they find.

For instance, if they find and report a Class I or Class II leak, it can be fixed before it becomes a Class III leak.

Likewise, if they spot shiny areas around a bolt head or nut–a good sign that it’s loose–and report it, it can be tightened before something breaks.

If they routinely eyeball trouble spots like wiring, hoses, belts and tires for wear, and report problems, you’ve got a chance to take action before major maintenance is needed.

What you do know can hurt you, too, but with a good reporting system at least you’ve got a fighting change.