Are You Flying with the Right Radio?

Pilots, having the right radio in your Lakota rotorcraft is the difference between communicating and not communicating.

The bad news is that some RT-5000 radios meant for Kiowa OH-58A/C models have been installed on the Lakota UH-72A models. The wrong radio sets were moved into unit avionic stocks and used in Lakotas as line replaceable units (LRUs).

 

Both airframes use RT-5000, remote-mount, multi-band AM/FM transceiver radios. The version used for OH-58A/C Kiowas does not allow for digital transmission and reception of the same frequency signals like the RT-5000 approved for the Lakota.

If your UH-72A’s radio isn’t operating properly, eyeball the part number (PN) and cross check that PN against the proper supplemental type certificate (STC) for the correct Mission Equipment Package (MEP) of the rotorcraft.

Lakotas operating in a security and support (S&S) MEP, need the RT-5000s with PN 400-105525-6011 for comm #4, and PN 400-105525-6111 for comm #5. For Lakotas in a non-S&S MEP configuration, the RT-5000 radio should be PN 400-015525-5111 operating in comm #4.

If you find an unauthorized radio in your Lakota, make the following entry in the aircraft logbook:

 

“RT-5000 (PN 400-015525-xxxx*) required removal and replacement per aircraft’s STC with correct RT-5000 (PN 400-015525-xxxx*)”

*Ensure the PN(s) reflect the RT-5000 to be removed and the correct PN(s) for the MEP version that is going to be installed.

Got questions about the RT-5000 radio? Contact Keith Stilwell, DSN 645-0797, (256) 955-0797 or email:

keith.e.stilwell.civ@mail.mil


Stocking Bench Stock

Keeping stock of shop and bench stock can be a real pain in the rear for mechanics responsible for a wide variety of Army equipment.

Wherever maintenance take place, bench stock should be available for use in each location. Bench stock is 30 days of supply (DOS) and is low cost, high use, consumable Class II, III (packaged), IV and IX (less components) items used by maintenance personnel at an unpredictable rate.

All the details are in AR 710-2, Supply Policy Below National Level (Mar 08). Check out Para 2-23 for shop stock and Para 2-24 for bench stock.

Bench stock consists of common hardware like resistors, wire, tubing, rope, welding rods, sandpaper, gasket material, sheet metal, seals, oils, grease, repair kits and more. Always make sure you get semiannual approval for a shop and bench stock list from your maintenance officer.

When you’ve got a lot of bench stock, you’ll need somewhere to keep it. For a few dollars, your unit can order a small parts storage box, NSN 8115-00-663-0212 or two transport and storage cases, NSN 8115-00-663-0213. The first case has 64 plastic drawers that are 3x3x5 inches each. The second case has 24 plastic drawers. Sixteen are 6x2x5 inches. The remaining eight of them are 6x4x5 inches. All the drawers come with dividers and a slot for inserting a label.


Pick the Right Type and Number of Jacks

Mechanics, aircraft jacks are vital for maintenance on your helicopter. They’ve been around for years and gone through a lot of changes. Some have been put out to pasture while others have been neglected.

Now, that won’t be a problem anymore because we told you on Pages 27-30 of PS 760 (Mar 16), how to maintain your jacked up jacks.

With all the changes, sometimes it’s difficult to determine which jack is used for which aircraft task. No longer. Here’s a list of the maintenance tasks that require jacks and how many to use:

Apache

   NOTE: These are typical tasks which require the aircraft to be placed on jacks. Please ensure you follow TM 1-1520-Longbow/Apache (IETM) for specific requirements, size, placement, warnings, cautions, and notes for all jacks.

  • Jacking aircraft, 3 point, using a tripod jack requires two 5-ton jacks, NSN 1730-00-516-2018, and one 3-ton jack, NSN 1730-00-734-9382. The Fuselage adapter, NSN 1560-01-226-7551, will also be used.
  • Jacking aircraft, 2 point, using a tripod jack requires two 5-ton jacks, NSN 1730-00-516-2018. The Fuselage adapter, NSN 1560-01-226-7551, will also be used.
  • Jacking tail landing gear using a tripod jack requires one 3-ton jack, NSN 1740-00-734-9382.
  • Jacking the main landing gear, 1 point, using an axle jack requires one 5-ton jack, NSN 1740-00-540-2343.                Chinook
  •    Note that Apache is the only helicopter airframe that uses the 5-ton jack, NSN 1730-00-516-2018.
  •  Jacking an entire Chinook requires two 12-ton jacks, NSN 1730-00-912-3998, and two 10-ton jacks, NSN 1730-00-203-4697. As an alternative method, you can use two 12-ton jacks, NSN 1730-00-912-3998, and one 10-ton jack, NSN 1730-01-563-7046.
  •  Replacing the forward right- or left-hand gear assembly requires one 10-ton jack, NSN 1730-01-563-7046. However, the aircraft weight must be below 24, 500 pounds.
  •  Replacing the forward right- or left-hand tire assembly requires one 10-ton jack, NSN 1730-203-4697.
  •  Replacing the aft right- or left- hand gear assemblies requires one 12-ton jack, NSN 1730-00-912-3998.
  •  Replacing the aft right- or left- hand tire assembly requires one 12-ton jack, NSN 1730-00-912-3998.
  • Weighing aircraft using load cells (3 point) with a max gross weight of 24,500 pounds requires two 12-ton jacks, NSN 1730-00-912-3998, and one 10-ton jack, NSN 1730-01-563-7046.
  •  Weighing aircraft using load cells (4 point) with a max gross weight of 33,000 pounds requires two 12-ton jacks, NSN 1730-00-912-3998, and two 10-ton jacks, NSN 1730-00-203-4697.
  •         A/C Model Kiowa Warrior
  • Jacking an entire OH-58A/C requires three 12-ton jacks, NSN 1730-00-912-3998.
  •          D-Model Kiowa Warrior
  •  Jacking an entire OH-58D requires   three 12-ton jacks, NSN 1730-00-912-3998.          Black Hawk Aircraft
  •    NOTE: When a Kiowa is on jacks, use an overhead hoist or cable support to maintain the aircraft. This is done as a safety precaution in the event a strong wind gust blows through the hangar and knocks the Kiowa off the jacks.
  •  Jacking requires three 12-ton jacks, NSN 1730-00-201-4849.
  •  Removal and installation of the right- and left-hand landing gear shock strut requires one 12-ton jack, NSN 1730-00-201-4849.
  • Jacking the right- and left-hand main landing gear wheel and tire assembly requires one 10-ton jack, NSN 1730-00-203-4697.
  • Removal and installation of the tail landing gear shock strut requires one 12-ton jack, NSN 1730-00-201-4849.
  •  Removal and installation of the     tail landing gear wheel and tire assembly requires one 10-ton jack, NSN 1730-00-203-4697.
  •  Weighing the helicopter using load cells (3 point) requires three 12-ton jacks, NSN 1730-00-201-4849.
  •  Changing a flat tire or collapsed strut requires one 12-ton jack, NSN 1730-00-201-4849, or one 10-ton jack, NSN 1730-00-912-4697.
  •  Changing a flat tail tire or collapsed gear strut requires one 12-ton jack, NSN 1730-00-201-4849, and one 10-ton jack, NSN 1730-00-912-4697.
  •             Lakota Aircraft
  •  Jacking an entire UH-72A aircraft takes four jacks. The type of jack is not specified, but two 12-ton tripod jacks, NSN 1730-00-912-3998, and two 10-ton landing gear jacks, NSN 1730-00-203-4697, work well.
  •  Weighing the Lakota requires three jacks. The type of jack is not specified, but one 12-ton tripod jack, NSN 1730-00-912-3998 and two 10-ton landing gear jacks, NSN 1730-00-203-4697 work well.

M151 Spotting Scope Upgrade

If your unit uses the M151 spotting scope, NSN 6650-01-504-8456, NSN 6650-01-557-7444 or NSN 6650-01-549-5838, good news! The scope is being upgraded to improve its performance when used with a night vision device. The upgrade includes a grid-based reticle and night vision adapter.

The upgrade will be done by MWO 9-6650-238-50-1. The old spotting scopes will be swapped out at Camp Robinson, Eglin Air Force Base, Ft Benning, Ft Bliss, Ft Bragg, Ft Campbell, Ft Carson, Ft Drum, Ft Hood, Ft Lewis, Ft Polk and Ft Stewart. The swaps will be scheduled through FORSCOM in accordance with AR 750-10. TACOM is managing the MWO.

If your unit isn’t located at one of these posts, the swap will be handled by mail. Contact your local MWO coordinator for instructions. It will take roughly a month for the mail-in swap.

Whether your M151 is being swapped out locally or mailed in, it should be stripped down and contain no down parts. Any parts turned in other than the scope won’t be returned and it will be the unit’s responsibility to replace them.

Questions? Contact Buck Sewell at (586) 282-1333 or email:

ernest.g.sewell.civ@mail.mil

or Christopher Kline at (586) 282-1357 or email:

christopher.m.kline4.civ@mail.mil


Repair, Don’t Replace, Precleaner

Item 1 of Fig 22 in TM 5-3805-298-24P (Mar 13) lists the 924H wheel loader’s precleaner, NSN 2940-01-068-7108. Replacing it will cost you a bit more than $107.

But what if it’s the cover or body that’s broken? Seems a shame to pay that much when only part of the precleaner is damaged.

Good news! Now you can replace those precleaner parts:

Item NSN Cost
Access cover 5340-00-103-8902 $17.56
Precleaner body 2940-00-876-2181 $19.65

ms-7490-m-fig-1

 

Repairing the precleaner will save you a lot of bucks over the cost of a new precleaner. Make a note until the parts are added to the TM.


Rubber Boot Cracks Don’t Deadline

ms-7488-m-fig-1Some units are deadlining the M1235A4/A5 MaxxPro Dash ISS MRAP during checks and services. Why? Because they see cracks in the rubber boot cover on the steering gear output shaft that connects to the pitman arm.

Step 3 of Items 15 and 106 in the PMCS tables of TM 9-2355-441-10 says to check the pitman arms for cracks and bends. If the pitman arm is cracked or bent, the vehicle is deadlined.

But this is a case of mistaken identity! This particular check is referring to the pitman arm itself, not the output shaft’s rubber boot.

Cracks or tears in the output shaft boot do not deadline your vehicle. Cracks there have no bearing on the form, fit or function of the pitman arm. The pitman arm has an internal seal to protect it.

For more info, check out TACOM Maintenance Information message 16-046:

https://tulsa.tacom.army.mil/Maintenance/message.cfm?id=MI16-046.html


Locking Block Can Ruin Your Piece of the PIED

The KGV-72 programmable in-line encryption device (PIED), NSN 5810-01-564-3364 (LIN E05008), is designed to encrypt Blue Force Tracking (BFT) message traffic.  But when it’s time to turn in the PIED, here’s a message that really needs to get through:

Don’t damage the locking block!

Too many units are losing or misplacing the padlock key.  So when it’s time to turn in the PIED, they use tools to remove the lock.  Unfortunately, that almost always breaks the locking block.

A broken block can’t be repaired.  Even worse, you can be held financially liable for replacing the $2,565.58 PIED per AR 735-5, Property Accountability Procedures and Financial Liability Officer’s Guide.  A DD Form 200, Financial Liability Investigation of Property Loss (FLIPL), along with a property book officer document number must be submitted at the time of the request to the item manager before an operational PIED can be issued.

So don’t lose the key to your lock.  And if you do, check with the item manager for instructions on what to do next.

kgv-72-fig-1