Maintenance Reports Equal Maintenance Dollars

Every time you open a work order or dispatch equipment, data is generated. If you add fuel or oil to a vehicle, data is generated. Whenever you operate unit equipment and put miles or hours on it—yep, you guessed it—that generates data, too.

Day-to-day unit operations and maintenance generates usage, work order and readiness data. That data is currently produced by legacy maintenance systems such as the Standard Army Maintenance System-Enhanced (SAMS-E), Standard Army Maintenance System-Installation Enhanced (SAMS-IE), Standard Army Maintenance System-Fleet Management (SAMS-FM) and the Army War Reserves Deployment System (AWRDS). Data is also created by the newer Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system: the Global Combat Support System–Army (GCSS-Army).

Why is this data important and how is it used? Congress evaluates consolidated maintenance and usage data to decide if budget requests are reasonable. With increasing budget constraints, it’s more important than ever to report accurate and complete maintenance data (including man-hours) so the Army can make sound fiscal decisions.

If data isn’t entered at all, done incorrectly or not reported in a timely fashion, the end result can be reduced dollars in a unit’s operating budget.

That’s because maintenance data is used to identify resource shortfalls and assess the ability to maintain authorized equipment. When units don’t report maintenance data, or it’s incomplete or inaccurate, higher headquarters might assume they have all the necessary resources to complete their missions.
The Army bases its decisions on unit-submitted data to determine each unit’s training resource model and OPTEMPO funding. Missing reports make it difficult for the Army to determine how much money units should receive for equipment maintenance and operation.

To help ensure that your unit is funded for future missions, be sure you submit timely, accurate maintenance data.

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