Sanitation Team FM

Over the course of the US Army’s 236-year history, disease and non-battle injuries have caused more casualties than battlefield wounds.  That’s an excellent reason to form a unit field sanitation team if you don’t already have one.  Start by reading FM 4-25.12, Unit Field Sanitation Team (Jan 02).  The FM discusses:

o team development and duties

o water and food sanitation

o waste disposal

o pest control

o heat and cold injuries

o toxic chemical hazards

o noise hazards

The FM also has:

o a team training course

o a list of supplies needed for field sanitation

    Paras 1-7 and 2-29 of AR 40-5, Preventive Medicine (May 07), require every company-sized Army unit to have a field sanitation team.

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Packaging…Part 1

Exiting the Methods
of Preservation Maze: Method 10

 

Previously, we told you about a maze of sorts—a maze of confusion caused by a general misunderstanding of military packaging preservation options.

Now we’ll show you five potential “exits” from that maze, starting with the first preservation option. This is Method 10, physical protection.

Method 10

    Method 10 gives physical and mechanical protection only. Use it for chemically noncritical items, like corrosion-resistant metals or inert nonmetals including crockery, ceramics or non-optical glass. Method 10 also works on items made deterioration-resistant by metal plating, paint, primer or plastic coatings or similar treatments/finishes.

Examples include motor vehicle bumpers and tires; tent poles, pegs and wire fencing; or other items designed for use in unprotected environments.

Remember, techniques used in Method 10 preservation will only protect items from physical and mechanical damage.

Use Method 10 along with your handy map: MIL-STD-2073-1, Standard Practice for Military Packaging.

Here are the two Method 10 packaging options:

  • Bundling: Use this packaging method for military supply items such as lumber, tent poles, stakes, rods, metal and non-metal pipes, etc. Follow these steps:

1. Clean and dry the item.

2. Apply cushioning, dunnage or blocking and bracing to any individual items that might be damaged. Use bundling material that is as clean and dry as possible.    Use protective pads, like cushioning or fiberboard, between the item and the bundling material to keep the strapping, wire or twine from damaging the item.

3. Tie, strap or tape the item to form the unit pack.

4. Apply markings according to MIL-STD-129, Military Marking for Shipment and Storage.

  • Cartonization or Boxing: This means enclosing items that are cleaned, dried, cushioned, and blocked and braced in a carton or box. Do not use contact preservatives or barriers that afford protection from the environment. Follow these steps:
  1. Clean and dry the item.
  2. Apply cushioning materials, dunnage, and blocking and bracing as needed to protect the item and the enclosing box or carton. That also keeps the item from moving inside the container.
  3. Enclose the item in a carton or box selected from MIL-STD-2073-1 (see Page 53 of Container Selection).
  4. Apply markings according to MIL-STD-129.

You won’t get lost in the methods of preservation “maze” as long as you use MIL-STD-2073-1 for a map. But if you get off the beaten path, the Logistics Support Activity’s Packaging, Storage and Containerization Center can help. Call DSN 795-7105, (570) 615-7105, or email:

toby.pt@us.army.mil

    In the next part of this series, we’ll explain Method 20.

Note:

You can find the publications referenced in this series at:

http://quicksearch.dla.mil/

     The quickest way to find a pub is to enter the number from its title (for example, MIL-STD-129 would be ‘129’) into the Document Number search box and then press the Submit button.

MS-4649-A Method 10


Packaging…Part Two

Exiting the Methods
of Preservation Maze: Method 20

Previously, we introduced you to a type of maze. It’s the “maze of indecision” caused by confusion over the various military packaging preservation methods.

In the prior article, we explained Method 10. This month we’ll cover Method 20, the second potential “exit” from the maze.

Method 20

    Method 20 is physical protection with preservative (with greaseproof wrap, as required).

Use Method 20 primarily on metal items when their characteristics allow application of a corrosion preventive compound by dipping, flow coating, slushing, spraying, flushing, brushing or fogging.

Items preserved by Method 20 must not be damaged or impaired when removing preservatives using solvents, vapor degreasers, or alkali metal-cleaning compounds.

To use Method 20, apply a preservative coating to the item and, in some cases, add a greaseproof wrap. The preservative coating protects the item against water, salt, gasses or fumes during handling, shipping and storage.

In Method 20, the entire chemical protection afforded to the item is through the contact preservative.

Using your map of MIL-STD-2073-1, Standard Practice for Military Packaging, follow these steps for Method 20:

  1. Clean and dry the item.
  2. Select and apply a preservative coating to the item or its parts as needed.

Note: Before proceeding to Step 3, allow parts coated with Code 01 or Code 19 preservatives to dry. Do not apply the wrap in Step 3 unless specified in the contract or order. Items treated with Code JL, VCI-treated barrier material (MIL-PRF-22019) or bag (MIL-B-22020), which are securely taped to make an airtight enclosure, are also exempt from the wrap in Step 3.

  1. Enclose the coated item, cushioned as required, in a wrap conforming to MIL-PRF-121, Type I or II.
  2. Apply markings according to MIL-STD-129.

If you get lost in the “maze” or need help, call the Logistics Support Activity’s Packaging, Storage and Containerization Center at DSN 795-7105, (570) 615-7105, or email:

toby.pt@us.army.mil

    Next time, we’ll discuss Method 30.

Note:

You can find the publications referenced in this series at:

http://quicksearch.dla.mil/

    The quickest way to find a pub is to enter the numbers from its title (for example, MIL-STD-129 would be ‘129’) into the Document Number search box and then press the Submit button.

MS-4650-A Method 20


Packaging … Part 3

Exiting the Methods
of Preservation Maze: Method 30

In this packaging series, we’ve been talking about a “maze of confusion” that’s caused by a failure to understand the different kinds of military packaging preservation methods.

We’ve already covered Methods 10 and 20. This time we’ll discuss the third packaging preservation option, Method 30.

Method 30

    This method is a bit trickier than the first two, so you’ll need a trusty map to “exit the maze” of packaging preservation options using Method 30. The best guide to use is MIL-STD-2073-1, Standard Practice for Military Packaging.

Method 30 preservation requires using waterproof or waterproof-greaseproof protection (with preservative, as required).

Packs are appropriate almost anytime the item will fit into a bag, a rigid container other than all metal, or as long as only waterproof or waterproof-greaseproof protection is needed.

However, Method 30 isn’t the right choice for packaging if water-vaporproof protection is also required—in that case, you must choose Method 40 or 50.

To use Method 30, place an item that is preserved, wrapped and cushioned as needed into a close-fitting box or carton. Enclose that box, in turn, in a sealed waterproof bag. Follow these steps:

1. Clean and dry the item.

2. Select and apply a preservative coating to the item or parts of it.

3. Apply a greaseproof wrap conforming to MIL-PRF-121, Type I or II.

4. Select a close-fitting inner container from MIL-STD-2073-1 or the container specified by the contract or order. See Page 53 of Container Selection.

5. Insert the item into the container along with cushioning and dunnage. This will protect the item from any projections or sharp edges and restrict its movement within the container.

6. Blunt the sharp edges and corners of the box to protect the bag selected in Step 7.

7. Enclose the box in a bag conforming to MIL-DTL-117, Type I, Class B. The following are examples of barrier (bag) materials meeting the MIL-DTL-117 requirement: A-A-3174, Type I or II, Grade A, Class 1 (see note below) and MIL-PRF-22191, Type III. Note: When specified, a protective wrap of heavy-duty kraft paper or equivalent (tape sealed) should be used to protect the barrier material.

8. Heat-seal the bag. Keep the trapped air between the box and the bag to a minimum by compressing the bag or by using mechanical means, such as a vacuum cleaner attachment. Be careful not to rupture the bag.

9. Apply markings according to MIL-STD-129.

If you get lost, call the Logistics Support Activity’s Packaging, Storage and Containerization Center at DSN 795-7105, (570) 615-7105, or email:

toby.pt@us.army.mil

    Next time, we’ll look at Method 40.

Note:

You can find the publications referenced in this series at:

http://quicksearch.dla.mil/

    The quickest way to find a pub is to enter any numbers from its title (for example, MIL-STD-129 would be ‘129’) into the Document Number search box and then press the Submit button.

MS-4651-A Method 30


Packaging . . .Part 4

         Exiting the Methods
of Preservation Maze: Method 40

 

For several articles now, we’ve walked you through a maze. It’s a maze caused by confusion over the different kinds of military packaging preservation options.

This time we’ll explain packaging preservation Method 40. It’s the fourth possible way to “exit the maze” of packaging preservation choices.

Method 40

     Method 40 requires the use of water- and vapor-proof protection (with preservative, as required).

This method is used for items such as circuit cards that are electrostatic discharge sensitive (ESDS). Make sure that only the correct electrostatic protective materials are used for the wrap and the bag when packaging ESDS items. Follow these steps:

  1. Clean and dry the item.
  2. Select and apply a preservative coating to the item or parts of it. The manufacturer normally applies permanent preservative coatings to ESDS items.
  3. Apply a greaseproof wrap only if a soft, dry preservative was applied to the item.
  4. If greaseproofing is not  required, apply a neutral wrap using a noncorrosive, dust- protective wrap prior to or as part of unit packing. Wrap ESDS items in ESD protective cushioning material. Fast Packs work well. See our in-depth article covering Fast Packs on Pages 56-60, PS 596 (Jul 02):

https://www.logsa.army.mil/psmag/archives/PS2002/596/596-56-60.pdf

  1. Place the item (wrapped and cushioned, as required) into a close-fitting, heat-sealed bag that meets specifications listed in MIL-PRF-131, Barrier Materials, Watervaporproof, Greaseproof, Flexible, Heat-Sealable.
  2. Mark the bag in accordance with MIL-STD-129, Military Marking for Shipment and Storage.

You may also be able to exit the maze through Submethod 41. This method  protects metallic and nonmetallic items against deterioration caused by water, water vapor, or natural or industrial contaminates and pollutants.

Items packed by Submethod 41 are generally lightweight and flat. They should be easily inserted into flat or envelope-type bags. Insert the item wrapped and cushioned as necessary into a water- and vapor-proof bag, exhaust the excess air and close the bag.

    Note: If you must use a carton or box with the unit container, place the cushioning specified in the contract or order between the bag and the carton or box. Mark the carton or box the same way as the bag. You’re good to go.

Whether you choose Method 40 or Submethod 41, you need to pay attention to detail. It’s easier if you use the MIL-STD-2073-1, Standard Practice for Military Packaging, as a map for the maze.

If you need guidance, call the packaging experts at the Logistics Support Activity’s Packaging, Storage and Containerization Center at DSN 795- 7105, (570) 615-7105, or email:

toby.pt@us.army.mil

    Stay tuned! Next time we’ll look at Method 50.

Note:

You can find the publications referenced in this series at:

http://quicksearch.dla.mil/

    The quickest way to find a pub is to enter any numbers from its title (for example, MIL-STD-129 would be ‘129’) into the Document Number search box and then press the Submit button.

MS-4652-A  Method 40


Packaging . . .Part 5

Exiting the Methods
of Preservation Maze: Method 50

 

   Welcome to the final article in our military packaging preservation series. For a long time now, we’ve guided you through a maze. It wasn’t a literal maze, but a maze of confusion over the different methods of packaging preservation. So once again, bring along your trusty map, MIL-STD-2073-1, Standard Practice for Military Packaging.

Method 50 is the only remaining “exit” available from the methods of preservation maze. To use Method 50, you’ll need to use water- and vapor-proof protection with desiccant. For sub Method 51, you’ll also enclose your preserved, wrapped, cushioned and desiccated item in a sealed bag. Use a humidity indicator and a Method 50 label. Follow these steps:

  1. Clean and dry the item.
  2. Select and apply a preservative coating to the item or parts of it. The manufacturer normally applies permanent preservative coatings to electrostatic-sensitive devices (ESDS).
  3. Apply a greaseproof wrap only if a soft, drying preservative has been applied to the item.
  4. If greaseproofing is not required, apply a neutral wrap with a noncorrosive, dust-protective wrap before or during unit packing.
  5. Place the item, including the required number of desiccant bags, wrapped and cushioned into a close-fitting, heat-sealed bag that meets specifications in MIL-DTL-117, Bags, Heat-Sealable. Bags made from the following material meet MIL-DTL-117 requirements: MIL-PRF-131, Type I or II, Class 1 or 2 and MIL-PRF-81705, Type I, Class 1 (ESDS items only).
  6. Firmly secure the humidity indicator immediately within the closable edge of the bag.
  7. Mark the bag in accordance with MIL-STD-129, Military Marking for Shipment and Storage. Apply a Method 50 label.

Note: If you must use a carton or box with the unit container, place the cushioning specified in the contract or order between the bag and the carton or box. Mark the carton or box the same way as the bag.

If there is not enough space to use a label, write “DESICCATED PACKAGE—DO NOT OPEN UNTIL READY FOR USE” on the container near the identification markings.

Congratulations! You’ve now safely exited the methods of preservation maze. Most important of all, you’ve learned the maze is navigable and that it’s a good idea to keep MIL-STD-2073-1 handy as your map.

You can get help at any time by calling the Logistics Support Activity’s Packaging, Storage and Containerization Center at DSN 795-7105, (570) 615-7105, or email:

toby.pt@us.army.mil

Note:

You can find the publications referenced in this series at:

http://quicksearch.dla.mil/

    The quickest way to find a pub is to enter any numbers from its title (for example, MIL-STD-129 would be ‘129’) into the Document Number search box and then press the Submit button.

MS-4653-A Method 50


Shadow Unmanned Aircraft System…

   Soar High With Shadow PM

 

The Shadow tactical unmanned aircraft system (TUAS) can’t soar high on its mission unless PM soars high with it.

Preflight inspections. Always perform every PMCS inspection and check  outlined in your TM before flight. Even when PMCS becomes old hat, never trust your memory. Always depend on the TM so you don’t miss anything.

Do all of your pre-flight inspections and before engine start checks like it says in TM 1-1550-689-CL, Operator’s Manual and Crewmember’s Checklist.

Solar shields. In searing heat, never leave the Shadow’s wings uncovered. The sun’s heat can warp the carbon fiber wings. Protecting the wings with solar shields also minimizes fuel loss through the fuel tip relief valve.

Fuel loss is caused by fuel expansion as it gets hot. The lost fuel is supposed to get caught in the overflow container on the wing tip relief valve. But if the valve fails, the fuel pouches rupture inside the wings. The fuel system is dependant on ZERO air ingestion at the engine, and a vacuum leak will cause air ingestion 99.99% of the time.

Launching the Shadow. Before launching the Shadow from the launcher, make it a habit to remove the tail hook pin before starting up the engine. Removing the pin lowers the tail hook so the Shadow can stop on the runway when landing. Forget the pin and the tail hook won’t catch the primary pendant during landing. The Shadow will overrun the runway and hit the net to stop.

Powering up the Shadow. Before starting up the Shadow, remember to remove the payload cover. When power is turned on, the infrared/optical sensor payload moves and rotates. If the cover is still attached, it will hit and damage the underside of the fuselage.

    Check the oil. The Shadow uses a lot of oil during flight. You must add oil before it flies again. Without enough oil, the Shadow may not make it back.

Maintenance upkeep. No matter what you do to the Shadow, all maintenance must be recorded in the logbook so other maintenance personnel will know what has been done in the past. For example, you must record what components were replaced and what failures occurred during flight. Also, if inaccurate flight hours are recorded, scheduled maintenance won’t take place on time.

To keep your Shadow in the air and not grounded, check out the good word in TM 1-1550-689-10-1 and 10-2, Operator’s Manual For Shadow 200 Tactical Unmanned Aircraft System (TUAS) (NSN 1550-01-534-3238).